The Design Process Series: An Introduction

 

For the next number of weeks, I’ll be breaking down the design process that I use with my clients.

This series is for you if one of the following resonates:

  • You have an interest in working with me and are curious of what that looks like.

  • You want to DIY your own brand and have a clear process to follow.

  • You run a design-oriented, creative business and want to implement a systematic client process.

Whether you're also a brand and web designer or whether you're a florist, cake designer, photographer, or more - this series is for you!

IMG_5671.JPG

Design, Step-by-Step

Not sure what a design process is? A design process is simply a way of breaking down a project into actionable and manageable steps in order to achieve a desired goal.

For a stylist, this goal might be an elegant styled shoot, for a stationer, perhaps it's a client’s luxury handmade wedding suite. For graphic designers, it might look like a full brand design implemented across multiple marketing collateral.

I think it’s important to be clear that no design process looks exactly the same.

A process is not implemented for cookie-cutter results. With every new project and new client comes new creative challenges and opportunities.

Having a process creates a more thoughtful experience.

A process is implemented for the purpose of serving both your client and yourself with a well thought out experience.

The process I use continually evolves as I see repeating patterns of how I work and areas of improvements I can make.

I’ve discovered that for myself, having the boundaries of a system in place allows room for creativity to flourish. It’s hard for anything to flourish amidst weeds of clutter.

laura-vidal-design-holistic-design.jpg

Having a process also produces more holistic design.

Holistic design? Yep! Similar to holistic wellness (considering what makes up a whole person such as their mental, physical, spiritual health, etc.), we achieve holistic design by striving to exam the entirety of our desired goal, otherwise known as a project’s “why?”.

You see, design is way more than simply a logo or colours, it’s more than an arrangement of flowers on a table, design is both problem solving and communication.

Colours, fonts, and layouts all communicate who you are and what you’re about! The easiest example I can think of is, would you trust a lawyer using the font comic sans? Probably not! A lawyer needs to communicate that they take their job seriously in order to be seen as trustworthy.

Similarly, a flower arrangement can communicate a bride and groom’s story, they can communicate the “why” of their decision to be married (if you’re a florist, you know what I’m talking about!).

See how much more meaningful it is to design with a holistic approach?

holistic-design-laura-vidal-design.png
holistic-design-free-resource.jpg

If you’re interested in learning more about holistic design I found this article from Interaction Design Foundation very helpful. I took the ideas from it and made it into a simple checklist as a reminder for myself to refer back to throughout the design process.

I made this into a free downloadable PDF for you to print at home.

If you’re a newsletter subscriber, you’ve already received it in your email. If not, subscribe below and instantly be able to download. Once selecting “Sign Up” stay on this page and download the PDF from the links under the title “Thank You”.  

Next week I’m sharing the beginning step of my design process, the discovery phase.